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  • Transforming leadership to achieve equity in education

    Building parent participation and shifting administrator mindsets

    In 2010, 47 percent of children under the age of five belonged to a racial or ethnic minority group[1]. That statistic signifies a shift in the demographics of tomorrow’s classrooms.

    As the nation’s K-12 students become increasingly diverse, school environments, educational policies, and teaching best practices must take students’ cultural backgrounds into account. Research of Dr. Katherine Rodela anticipates changes needed in K-12 schools. The educational leadership professor is rethinking the role of parent leadership in school systems. She is also examining how district leaders can develop an equity mindset—the belief that by engaging members of ... » More ...

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  • Multimillion dollar grant to support nuclear waste cleanup

    Research probes how radiation changes nuclear waste over time

    Safe management of nuclear waste is vital to national security and a primary mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Approximately 300 million liters of highly radioactive wastes are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

    Wastes stored in tanks at Hanford have been there for decades. Radiation present in the wastes drives chemical changes that are neither well understood nor predictable. DOE estimates it will take at least 50 years and $300 billion to process the wastes into forms fit for disposal using ... » More ...

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  • Student research

    Innovation spawns entrepreneurial venture

    Every year, reused and infected hypodermic needles cause 1.3 million deaths. Two 2016 WSU bioengineering graduates developed a cost-effective solution.

    Emily Willard and Katherine Brandenstein designed a sterilizing cap that fits over the opening of a vaccine vial, decontaminating needles to help save lives. Both young women are researchers at heart, but dove into the world of business to turn their discoveries into a technology for commercialization. With help from entrepreneurship experts at WSU, Willard and Brandenstein developed a prototype of their product and launched a company.

    The duo won the WSU Business Plan competition and the University of Washington’s first ... » More ...

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  • Supplying food, energy, and water for future generations

    Helping the Columbia Basin withstand climate change

    In Washington’s Columbia River basin, climate change has diminished snow storage, a significant source of summer water for the region. At the same time, population growth is escalating demand for water.

    The basin is home to farms and ranches that feed the state. Hydropower generates more than half of the Pacific Northwest’s electricity, most coming from the Columbia River.1 Resources must be deftly managed to develop the region’s resilience to climate change.

    Population growth and climate change strain interdependent food, energy and water systems. WSU researchers have long studied each of these systems alone. A recent $3 million grant from the National ... » More ...

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  • Promoting an informed and equitable society

    Preserving indigenous traditions in digital form

    A complete picture of U.S. history requires the information held in tribal archives, libraries, and museums (TALMs). While many major libraries and museums now digitize their collections for access and use, many TALMs lack the resources to do so. In addition, traditional content management systems are organized under Western standards, not allowing for local narrations and other cultural practices and protocols important to archiving Native heritage.

    Digitally preserving and sharing stories, artifacts, and images from diverse cultures is important in a technologically advancing world. WSU researcher Kim Christen is ensuring that digital history includes Native American voices stored and ... » More ...

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  • Innovation for Washington’s signature industry

    WSU created a brand new apple variety called Cosmic Crisp™, known for its excellent flavor, good texture, and superior storage. Cosmic Crisp™ is a cross between Enterprise and Honeycrisp.

    More than 600,000 trees are expected to be planted this spring, and growers have ordered over 5 million trees for 2018. First harvest will be in 2019. Fruit will become widely available to consumers in 2020.

    Cosmic Crisp™ is the latest example of WSU’s world-class tree fruit breeding program and the University’s commitment to the state’s tree-fruit industry.

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  • Research worldwide to protect America

    Preventing spread of disease in Kenya

    In Kenya, 42 percent1 of the population falls below the poverty line. Lack of health care among the impoverished increases the risk of hard-to-control disease outbreaks. Understanding and preventing infectious disease threats among vulnerable populations in rural and urban settings is important to global health security.

    Kariuki Njenga addresses these challenges using a “One Health” approach, which recognizes that human health is connected to the health of animals and the environment. With a $3.4 million, five-year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Dr. Njenga conducts investigations that aim to combat major health challenges in Kenya, ... » More ...

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  • First-of-its-kind research capability

    Revealing secrets of material behavior at extreme conditions

    While exposing a sample of silicon to extreme dynamic compression–due to the impact of a nearly 12,000 mph plastic projectile–WSU scientists documented the transformation from its common cubic diamond structure to a simple hexagonal structure. At one point, they could see both structures as the shock wave traveled through the sample in less than half a millionth of a second.

    WSU led the development of this experimental capability, which allows scientists to watch atomic-level changes unfold in the composition and behavior of materials under extreme conditions. Experiments take place in a facility called the Dynamic Compression Sector ... » More ...

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  • Harnessing technology to improve quality of life

    New promise for solar energy

    A breakthrough by WSU researcher Kelvin Lynn could help solar energy compete with fossil fuels for generating electricity.

    Commercial success of solar technology has been constrained by the cells’ performance and cost. Key to addressing both concerns are the materials from which solar cells are made.

    Seeking an alternative to silicon

    Silicon solar cells represent 90 percent of the solar cell market. Because silicon is a costly material to use in manufacturing, it keeps the price of solar cells high. A low-cost alternative is cadmium telluride (CdTe), which outperforms silicon in real-world conditions, such as low light and hot, humid ... » More ...

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  • The uncompromising pursuit of healthier people and communities

    Addressing health disparities and preventing disease

    American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities experience elevated rates of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. These communities are historically underserved when it comes to health care. Little research has been conducted to better understand and address their health care needs.

    Dr. Dedra Buchwald of the WSU Health Sciences Spokane campus hopes to equip these communities with powerful tools to improve blood pressure control, and ultimately cardiovascular disease and stroke. With a $10 million grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, Dr. Buchwald will work with a Southwest tribe, an Alaska Native health ... » More ...

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  • Feb. 21: Literature helps understand today’s issues

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Parallels between past- and present-day concerns – and how literature helps illuminate them – will be discussed by Washington State University English professor Donna M. Campbell in “Edith Wharton’s Two Americas” at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, in Goertzen 21.

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  • WSU helps map quinoa genome, improve ‘super food’

    By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Discovery of the first high-quality genome of quinoa, published this week in Nature, could help create healthier, tastier varieties of this protein-packed “super food.”

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  • WSU research highlights deforestation threat to jaguars

    By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Accelerating deforestation of jaguar habitat, especially in corridors connecting conservation areas, threatens the long-term survival of the iconic predator, according to new research by Dan Thornton, an assistant professor in the Washington State University School of the Environment.

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  • March 10: Abstract deadline for environmental papers

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Abstract submissions are due March 10 from graduate students in the humanities, social sciences and biophysical sciences at Washington State University and University of Idaho for an interdisciplinary conference April 1 at WSU.

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  • Economist wins fellowship to improve community health

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Coordinating patient care among providers to improve health and lower costs is the focus of a proposal by a Washington State University professor who recently was awarded a $5,000 one-year community health fellowship.

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  • Rewards treat alcohol abuse in those with mental illness

    By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane

    SPOKANE, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University have shown that offering prizes – from simple shampoo to DVD players – can be an effective, low-cost treatment for alcohol abuse, the nation’s third leading preventable cause of death.

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  • Researchers tackle impact of climate change on plants

    By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are undertaking an industrious investigation into the effects of global warming on plants. Making the effort possible is a fully automated “plant hotel” that can analyze up to 6,000 seedlings in a single experiment.

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  • Sperm changes documented years after chemotherapy

    By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

    PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has documented epigenetic changes in the sperm of men who underwent chemotherapy in their teens.

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  • WSU wins grant for recycled textile innovation

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University has won a $365,000 grant for research on recycling cotton waste products into high quality regenerated fibers for consumer goods.

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  • Adesope reappointed to board of top education journal

    PULLMAN, Wash. – Sola Adesope, associate professor of educational psychology, has been invited to serve a second term on the editorial board of the Review of Educational Research (RER), which has ranked as the No. 1 education research journal by the Social Science Citation Index for a number of years.

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Additional WSU research news stories

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